About us

We are the SCOR working group 149, focussing on Changing Ocean Biological Systems (COBS) and particularly on How will biota respond to a changing ocean?

From left to right: Ulf Riebesell, Sinead Collins, Jonathan Havenhand, David Hutchins, Jorge Navarro, Jean-Pierre Gattuso, Philip Boyd, Kunshan Gao 

From left to right: Ulf Riebesell, Sinead Collins, Jonathan Havenhand, David Hutchins, Jorge Navarro, Jean-Pierre Gattuso, Philip Boyd, Kunshan Gao 

It all started when...

Climate models all project concurrent alterations to multiple oceanic properties, due to the effects of anthropogenic climate change. These projections are supported by a growing body of ocean observatory evidence demonstrating simultaneous shifts in life-sustaining properties such as temperature, CO2, O2, and nutrients. Hence, a major challenge for marine sciences is to determine the cumulative effects of such interactive and widespread alterations of oceanic conditions on organisms, communities and ecosystems. This challenge is multi- faceted, and research must advance in parallel to tackle three major themes: effects of multiple environmental drivers on the performance of individual organisms; community and foodweb responses to complex ocean change; and timescales of biological responses to climate change.

Consequently, we urgently need to develop a new generation of studies based on methodology that will allow us to progress from: 

Single to Multiple  drivers

Organisms to ecosystems

Acclimation to Adaptation 

This proposed SCOR working group will build strong transdisciplinary linkages to facilitate the design and development of a framework of experiments, observations, and conceptual/mathematical models to evolve each of these themes. This multi-thematic approach will provide a platform for the next generation of scientists to conduct rigorous inter-related research and to further refine this approach as new technologies emerge. The working group will also target how to develop powerful tools to convey the major research findings of this complex topic as directly and simply as possible for decision-makers in the marine realm.